tymekz
Today my brother experienced something horrible. His roommate of 25 yrs old committed suicide & my brother found him. My brother is ok; as soon as I received t call.. I rushed over & helped move him out & is now staying w me. My brother believes in a higher power but it's weird w him. My question is, in a situation like this.. How would a Buddhist react or think of such an unfortunate experience? Please share your thoughts on this bc sometimes I don't like to go by just my own understanding.

buddhajourney:

I am deeply sorry to hear that. I will be praying for your brother’s friend.

In Buddhism, killing, even suicide, is breaking the first precept and the biggest no-no. If one kills, it’s an automatic sentence to hell regardless of who they are. However, depending on their merit and good deeds (karma), that will determine the duration of their stay. It could be for just a moment, a day, a month, a year, or a whole lifetime.

One of my favorite stories from the Jataka Takes (stories of Buddha’s past lives) is when he was a Bodhisattva on a ship with 500 people. Because he was a Bodhisattva, he had the power of clairvoyance and saw that there was a man planing on killing everyone on board. He had two choices: to do nothing or to kill the one man and go to hell. He ended up killing the one man in order to save 500 and as a consequence went to hell… but only for a moment! Because he was a Bodhisattva with great merit, it outweighed the evil deed.

In Buddhism, killing is bad, but killing oneself if really bad, because you not only hurt yourself, but you hurt everyone around you; your family, friends, co-workers, the girl at the coffee shop that knew your order, the homeless man on your corner that you always gave change to and joked around with… so many people! And you also waste a life that could be doing so much good and helping so many people. 

Of course, everyone has their problems and issues. People who commit suicide have some deep, dark issues they thought no one would understand or could help. That’s understandable. But there’s always help. Someone might not always be able to help you, but you can ALWAYS help yourself, no matter how small or subtle the change.

All you and your brother can do is pray for him. If you can, chant the Amitabha Sutra. Or chant Amitabha’s name as many times as you can while the friend as your main focus. Whether he goes to Amitabha’s Pure Land or not, you still want him to hear the prayers and avoid any unfortunate rebirths.

Smile and be well!

I’ve never once read a mention of Hell in any Buddhist literature. Where are you getting this from?

About suicide, if help is always available and “one can always help themselves” as you’ve stated - then there wouldn’t be ANY SUICIDE - which is far from the case.

The dark thoughts and feelings people have are unique and can’t be fully understood or experienced by anyone but themselves.

I believe Buddhist or any other type of meditation or prayer along with therapy & possibly medication can help but not always. You make it seem like suicide shouldn’t exist in light of all the “help” available when it is and always has been an epidemic in human culture.

psychotherapy:

Here are five one-minute activities from One Minute Mindfulness that you can practice every day to find the extraordinary in the ordinary.

1.  Consider one small act of kindness you can do for someone.

For instance, in a minute, you can send a sweet email or give a compliment, Altman writes. If you don’t see anyone that day, he suggests being kind to yourself. It also helps to take a minute and remember a kind gesture from someone else that really made a difference in your life.

2.  Bring a dose of creativity to your workday.

Work no doubt takes up a large portion of our days. And no doubt the tasks can quickly become tedious. Fortunately, being mindful “can help you tap into a deeper sense of purpose and turn on the lamp of creativity,” Altman writes. He suggests striving to do one small creative thing at work or saying an affirmation, such as “The treasure of creativity is available to me at all times,” or “I let go of expectation and let creativity come to me.”

3. Find pleasantness at work.

Altman notes that this is one of the most profound practices. “Pleasantness is an anchor that helps us center by locating the peace that is ever-present, even when it is hidden.” You can find pleasantness in a song, a sound, a scent or a blade of grass, he says. All you have to do is scan your surroundings. Altman also suggests bringing a pleasant object to work – such as a photo of a loved one – or having something portable with you at all times.

4.  Calm anxious thoughts with a pebble.

Altman compares an anxious mind to a raging river. But it’s possible to find a safe place underneath the turbulent waves. You can do this by repeating a neutral word. Choose a word that doesn’t bring up any memories, associations or feelings, he says. He gives the following examples: one, peace, calm, neutral. “The pebble’s purpose is to distance you from the turbulence and settle you into the deep, still water, where you can see all around clearly,” he writes. When other thoughts pop up, just view them as shiny fish swimming past.

5.  Gaze at the sky and moon.

According to Altman, gazing at the sky and moon allows us to embrace wholeness and fosters pure awareness. He cited a quote from British philosopher and Zen practitioner Alan Watts on our interdependency with nature: “You’re breathing. The wind is blowing. The trees are waving. Your nerves are tingling. The individual and the universe are inseparable, but the curious thing is, very few people are aware of it. Everything in nature depends on everything else. So it’s interconnected…When you look out of your eyes at nature happening out there, you’re looking at you.”

As you start gazing, Altman suggests noticing your breath and if any tension or emotions are present. Then look out to the vast sky, paying attention, moment to moment, he says. You also can think of a specific problem or challenge you’ve been having and “release it to the spaciousness of the sky as you gaze. Whatever your challenge, let it be part of the big perspective and the big wisdom that exist in nature, free from the small you that holds on to it.”

Don’t let the minutes whiz by. Open your eyes, and notice the beauty surrounding you. Just one minute can make a difference in your days.

(Learn more about Donald Altman and One Minute Mindfulness)

Ally Rose #centralpark #nyc  (at Central Park Conservatory Gardens)

Ally Rose #centralpark #nyc (at Central Park Conservatory Gardens)

Killer birthday gift from mom!

Killer birthday gift from mom!

#brooklyn (at Prospect Park - Lakeside)

#brooklyn (at Prospect Park - Lakeside)

#pattern recognition  (at 6 Mile Loop, Central Park)

#pattern recognition (at 6 Mile Loop, Central Park)

#Ukrainian #cabbagepatch #kids (at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)

#Ukrainian #cabbagepatch #kids (at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)

I tend to keep exercise sneakers for too long. Been about two years since I bought my last pair. Got some new #Adidas #Boost runners yesterday. Happy feet and happy me. (at Central Park, New York)

I tend to keep exercise sneakers for too long. Been about two years since I bought my last pair. Got some new #Adidas #Boost runners yesterday. Happy feet and happy me. (at Central Park, New York)

justdharmaquotes:

Morality, concentration and wisdom ~ Sayadaw U. Panditahttp://bit.ly/1q48bc6

We do not practice meditation to gain admiration from anyone. Rather, we practice to contribute to peace in the world. We try to follow the teachings of the Buddha, and take the instructions of trustworthy teachers, in hopes that we too can reach the Buddha’s state of purity. Having realized this purity within ourselves, we can inspire others and share this Dhamma, this truth.

The Buddha’s teachings can be summed up in three parts: sila, morality; samadhi, concentration; and panna intuitive wisdom.

Sila is spoken of first because it is the foundation for the other two. Its importance cannot be overstressed. Without sila, no further practices can be undertaken. For lay people the basic level of sila consists of five precepts or training rules: refraining from taking life, refraining from taking what is not given, refraining from sexual misconduct, refraining from lying, and refraining from taking intoxicating substances. These observances foster a basic purity that makes it easy to progress along the path of practice.

Sayadaw U. Pandita

from the book “In This Very Life: The Liberation Teachings of the Buddha”http://amzn.to/1ttvzQP

justdharmaquotes:

Morality, concentration and wisdom ~ Sayadaw U. Pandita
http://bit.ly/1q48bc6

We do not practice meditation to gain admiration from anyone. Rather, we practice to contribute to peace in the world. We try to follow the teachings of the Buddha, and take the instructions of trustworthy teachers, in hopes that we too can reach the Buddha’s state of purity. Having realized this purity within ourselves, we can inspire others and share this Dhamma, this truth.

The Buddha’s teachings can be summed up in three parts: sila, morality; samadhi, concentration; and panna intuitive wisdom.

Sila is spoken of first because it is the foundation for the other two. Its importance cannot be overstressed. Without sila, no further practices can be undertaken. For lay people the basic level of sila consists of five precepts or training rules: refraining from taking life, refraining from taking what is not given, refraining from sexual misconduct, refraining from lying, and refraining from taking intoxicating substances. These observances foster a basic purity that makes it easy to progress along the path of practice.

Sayadaw U. Pandita

from the book “In This Very Life: The Liberation Teachings of the Buddha”
http://amzn.to/1ttvzQP

I’m 16 weeks old today! Happy Friday. #baby (at Pretty & Pretty Nails)